Equine Welfare – Making a Difference in the Horse World

Equine Welfare – Making a Difference in the Horse World

by Dr. Mike Guerini, www.dunmovinranch.com

Over the past few weeks, I have witnessed video sharing, rule change recommendations and conversations about Equine Welfare – all of which have brought forth heated discussions at times. Certainly Equine Welfare is of the HIGHEST importance for all of us equestrians….but resorting to arguments is not the way to get help to the horse.

I do believe that passion about Equine Welfare is great. Enthusiasm about promoting Equine Welfare is great. So a few hours ago I read a note from a person who asked – what can we do when we see bad things happening to horses. This question had me thinking for a few hours and I wanted to share a few of my thoughts.

  1. Use evidence based knowledge/information in your discussions. Do not simply tell someone that something looks bad therefore it must be wrong.  Have reasons why something you are seeing is wrong. Explain how the issue is affecting the welfare of the horse.  But when you explain…stay calm and focused…when you are calm and focused then people listen. As soon as you yell or call names…people quit listening.
  2. Promote equine welfare education. Get involved in groups and organizations that promote equine welfare.  If the organization you are associated with is simply critical – ask them to develop plans to help improve the welfare of the equine.  The International Society of Equitation Science (http://www.equitationscience.com) is one such organization that promotes equine welfare.
  3. Ask someone to explain why he/she is doing something and how it works to “help” the horse. Sometimes when a person has to explain how something is a good thing … when they are asked politely … they may be at a loss for an answer and hours later, they will still think on what you asked and begin to realize that if they cannot explain the concept clearly….then maybe it is not something they should be doing (This is particularly true of training equipment).  Those voices inside our heads can and do help people redirect moral and ethical compasses.  Cause people to think and you will affect how they act.
  4. Show that there is a better way. Get out and demonstrate and explain how your way….is the correct way to do things and betters the welfare of the horse.  Win with class and with horse welfare as your Battle Cry … and people will begin to follow what you are doing.  Rules and laws are not always the way to affect change…sometimes you have to show people the correct way to bring about change.
  5. Report issues to stewards, barn owners, barn managers, and Association representatives. When I say report…I am encouraging you to make a written/formal complaint.  Walking up to someone and telling them what you saw … well it works for about 30 seconds .. but in the end Give the person in charge specifics and information they can use to go and make the change or to help the horse that is in a bad situation.
  6. Speak to the person directly. Talking behind someone’s back is not a way to influence them or to help the horse.  Look the person in the eye and tell them what you think (see #1 and #3 above).

These are just a few thoughts. I encourage you to promote equine welfare. I encourage all of you to work for the horse and to be his/her advocate.

For my part I am a member of the International Association of Equitation Science because I believe in what the organization is doing to promote evidenced based equine welfare.

Share this blog if you think it might help a horse. Thank you.

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Dr. Mike Guerini is a clinician, author of multiple Horsemanship books, co-inventor of the Equine Hydro-T and specializes in western performance based instruction and you can learn more about Dr. Mike and his 6 C’s of Horsemanship at www.dunmovinranch.com.  Dr. Mike is also part of Coach’s Corral (http://www.coachscorral.com/), an online Horsemanship Coaching program that specializes in video coaching and the 5 Ride Program.  Dun Movin Ranch is also home of the Equine Hydro-T (http://www.hydrot.com/).

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Ranch Riding (Pleasure) Classes – 5 Keys to Success

Ranch Riding (Pleasure) Classes – 5 Keys to Success   

by Dr. Mike Guerini, www.dunmovinranch.com

Ranch Riding classes are continuing to grow in popularity. This class showcases the versatility and movement of the ranch style horses. In Ranch Riding (formerly called Ranch Pleasure), a horse and rider show in a pattern that has walk, trot, extended trot, lope and extended lope. This is very different from the movement being looked for in Western Pleasure. The horse and rider must also perform some ranch style movements. These movements can include side passing, 360 degree turns, lead changes, walk or trot or lope over poles to name just a few of the options. This year in California a similar class, Ranch Riding – Flat Class was showcased at Gold N’ Grand at Rancho Murieta in August and the judges focused on the horse gaits without needing to have any maneuvers. The horse and rider are scored on the rhythm and cadence of the gaits. Smoothness and flow of the performance matter as well.

So how does a horse and rider do well in this class – Here are my 5 Keys to Success in Ranch Riding.

  1. Transitions. Be able to make smooth and balanced transitions between gaits with your horses. No tail swishing or horse inversion/hollowing out the back or lifting the head. Ride and make the transition as if nothing really happened…make this look like an everyday occurrence as you ride out to get a job done. Use your seat and legs and a little bit of rein on your downward transitions…not just your reins.
  2. Balance. I know I mentioned balanced transitions above but in Ranch Riding you want your horse to be in balance all the time. No working off the forehand, no leaning or falling on a shoulder. Present your horse as if at any moment you will need to make a change (as in go off an get a calf, move a herd of horses, etc.). Make sure your horse is balanced and the footwork/footfalls will be correct and rewarded.
  3. Know your gaits. Extending your gaits at the trot and lope are not about going faster….they are about covering ground. An extended stride comes from the horse using its rear end and making the stride cover more ground. Keep the rhythm correct as you lengthen the stride.
  4. Rider Preparation. This has multiple components.  The rider needs to have good stamina and flexibility. Your core needs to be working to help you succeed in Ranch Riding. The key here is to be a flexible and agile rider able to guide your horse with the least amount of effort and by using soft aids.
  5. Know your pattern. This goes beyond memorizing all the parts of the pattern. Really know the pattern by planning where you will execute the movement in the arena, know where you will give your aids, know the details of the pattern so well that it comes second nature to you and your riding.

This is an exciting class and one that offers a great test to horse and rider.

Share this blog with a friend who might be interested in Ranch Riding…I am sure it will help horse and rider on the road to success in Ranch Riding.

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Dr. Mike coaches riders in Ranch Riding and offers clinics throughout the U.S. His students have won at local and State level AQHA shows and one qualified for the 2015 AQHA world in Ranch Riding. Dr. Mike Guerini is a clinician, author of multiple Horsemanship books, co-inventor of the Equine Hydro-T and specializes in western performance based instruction and you can learn more about Dr. Mike and his 6 C’s of Horsemanship at www.dunmovinranch.com.  Dr. Mike is also part of Coach’s Corral (http://www.coachscorral.com/), an online Horsemanship Coaching program that specializes in video coaching and the 5 Ride Program.  Dun Movin Ranch is also home of the Equine Hydro-T (http://www.hydrot.com/).

Thinking on Balanced Horsemanship and Equine Welfare

by Dr. Mike Guerini, www.dunmovinranch.com

Balanced Horsemanship

Dr. Mike Guerini is a clinician, author of multiple Horsemanship books, co-inventor of the Equine Hydro-T and specializes in western performance based instruction and you can learn more about Dr. Mike and his 6 C’s of Horsemanship at www.dunmovinranch.com.  Dr. Mike is also part of Coach’s Corral (http://www.coachscorral.com/), an online Horsemanship Coaching program that specializes in video coaching and the 5 Ride Program.  Dun Movin Ranch is also home to the Equine Hydro-T (http://www.hydrot.com/).

Riding Both Sides of your Horse — 5 Thoughts

Riding Both Sides of your Horse  — 5 Thoughts

by Dr. Mike Guerini, Ph.D. (www.dunmovinranch.com)

Does your horse have a difference in response on one side as compared to the other side?

As we become better riders, we must develop the ability to ride both sides of our horse – as the horse needs.

To do this, we need to feel the different sides.  Do you know which side of your horse is stiff, which side is hollow?  The stiff side has more tension and the horse’s jaw and poll is tighter and more resistant.  The body might feel like one giant solid 4 x 4 post.  Horses often lean into the stiffer side, fall (drop shoulder) into a circle, or make tight and abrupt turns.  On the hollow side, the horse has no resistance and you might have to work to keep contact on your horse because it gives so slightly to pressure.  As you move in the direction of the hollow side, the horse may drift to the outside or overbend.

There are reasons for a horse to have a difference between sides.  A horse can be right or left handed (scientifically proven based on in-utero implantation) and this creates a difference between the sides, uneven muscle development, and rider related issues (balance, rider asymmetry, etc.).

Here are five thoughts about how you can make sure you ride both sides of your horse.

  1. Determine which side is the hollow side and which is the stiff side.  When you know this, you can make certain that through correct exercises you help the horse become more balanced/even on each side.  Work with your coach to develop a plan so that you actively exercise both sides of your horse.
  2. Do contralateral training for the rider.  Make certain you are doing the right exercises for the rider – these should include contralateral exercises (exercises that rely on movement of body parts on the opposite side of the body).  This is important so that you can effectively use (for example) inside leg to outside rein (opposite parts of your body need to work in harmony).
  3. Improve Rider balance.  Work on rider balance with Pilates, Yoga, Tai Chi, or other programs that help you strengthen your balance and core.  Along the way, make sure your exercise program includes some good cardio work.
  4. Learn how to apply the aids correctly and as needed.  You may need a stronger aid on one-side verses the other (early on in your training).  Know this and make certain you adjust to the needs of your horse as you bring him into balance.  This will take time and it really benefits from riding with mirrors in your arena and even more so when you have a coach or video your rides (or video rides and review with your coach…even better).
  5. Learn to feel the balance in your horse.  This takes time but it is very critical.  Have an observer help you develop the feel.  Learn how it feels when your horse bulges out on one side, drops its shoulder on another side, has its rear end fall out of the circle or square.  Feel comes with time and it really helps to have someone coaching you (eyes on the ground as we say) so that you can have them tell you what is happening and you can develop the knowledge and feel….with this and your own rider preparation – you can then ride both sides of your horse to put him into balance and achieve rider to horse harmony.

Thank you for reading and please feel free to share.

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Dr. Mike Guerini is a clinician, author of multiple Horsemanship books, co-inventor of the Equine Hydro-T and specializes in western performance based instruction and you can learn more about Dr. Mike and his 6 C’s of Horsemanship at www.dunmovinranch.com.  Dr. Mike is also part of Coach’s Corral (http://www.coachscorral.com/), an online Horsemanship Coaching program that specializes in video coaching and the 5 Ride Program.  Dun Movin Ranch is also home to the Equine Hydro-T (http://www.hydrot.com/).

Frame – Self-Carriage – Roundness – Collection — Do you know the difference?

Frame – Self-Carriage – Roundness – Collection — Do you know the difference?

by Dr. Mike Guerini, Ph.D. (www.dunmovinranch.com)

We take great liberties with the English language these days when we speak, text and, write. Two, Too, and To are often texted as “2” and this is just one example of us interchanging words and letters and numbers so that we do not always have to think about the exact spelling, meaning, or detail of a simple word.

As equestrians, we find ourselves in training or instructing or learning and we get challenged to describe what we are feeling.  We often use words that we think we understand their meaning…but in truth … we heard someone else say the word and we think it sounds correct or powerful or authoritative.

Four words in particular — Frame – Self-Carriage – Roundness – Collection — are often used interchangeably and by that—they are used incorrectly. These words are not interchangeable. The four terms are distinct in meaning, appearance, and feel when riding. Let us begin with defining these words normally, without the equestrian perspective….and then defining with the equestrian perspective.

General Population Definitions of these words:

Frame — to construct by fitting and uniting the parts of the skeleton of (a structure)

Self-Carriage — manner of bearing the body, deportment

Roundness — having curves rather than angles

Collection — the act or process of getting things from different places and bringing them together

Even in everyday use, these words have distinct meanings. Now let us look at them through the eyes of an equestrian.

Equestrian Definitions of these words:

Frame — Horse traveling in a predetermined outline.  Frame has a particular look.  We can influence the frame with natural and artificial aids.

Self-Carriage — the horse carries himself in the best and most appropriate manner for the movement he has to execute. Self-carriage is the result of balance.  This requires time and patience and good equitation for us to be able to work with our horse to be in balance and self-carriage.

Roundness — horse lifts his back so that the hind end can reach under further and the topline can become rounder. Again — This requires time and patience and good equitation for us to be able to work with our horse to achieve correct roundness.

Collection — to shift his center of gravity more over his hind feet by increasing the bend in his hocks and stifles. That lowers his hindquarters, shortens his strides, and means that when he thrusts off the ground, his impulsion now becomes more “up” than “forward.”  The holy grail and top of the training scale.  An often sought after, moderately achieved activity that the horse can sustain for short periods of time (note….it is not good to announce proudly that you rode your horse in collection for over an hour….just not a good plan and likely it did not happen, nor would a good equestrian want it to happen)

Simply by reading these definitions, you can begin developing a mental picture of how they are different and of course how these concepts work together. A multitude of people have discussed these concepts in excellent detail and below I share with you some of the references I use as I continue to advance my learning (See links below).

My challenge to you as fellow equestrians is to become more exacting in the words you use to describe what your horse and you are achieving.  By being more exacting – you will improve your training, develop reasonable and progressive goals, and have more fun and success.

Thanks for reading and please feel free to share this blog to encourage other equestrians to learn more and to develop more exacting standards of language as horsemen and horsewomen.

From Manolo Mendez website — Balance & Rhythm in the Young Horse: Essential to Forward and Self Carriage (first independent balance)

From Karen Rolf – Dressage Naturally — Self Carriage from a Dressage, Naturally Perspective

Meredith Manor – Training Mythunderstandings: The Training Tree: Collection

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Dr. Mike Guerini is a clinician, author of multiple Horsemanship books, co-inventor of the Equine Hydro-T and specializes in western performance based instruction and you can learn more about Dr. Mike and his 6 C’s of Horsemanship at www.dunmovinranch.com.  Dr. Mike is also part of Coach’s Corral (http://www.coachscorral.com/), an online Horsemanship Coaching program that specializes in video coaching and the 5 Ride Program.  Dun Movin Ranch is also home to the Equine Hydro-T (http://www.hydrot.com/).

Grandson of Alydar – Starving in a Creek Bed – Saved by a Rescue – 2nd life in Western Dressage

Grandson of Alydar – Starving in a Creek Bed – Saved by a Rescue – 2nd life in Western Dressage

Grandson of Alydar – Starving in a Creek Bed – Saved by a Rescue – 2nd life in Western Dressage

by Dr. Mike Guerini, Ph.D. (www.dunmovinranch.com)

The story of any great Thoroughbred might begin with talks of Man O’ War…some people may immediately think of Secretariat and of course many will think of Seabiscuit.  Hollywood has done a fabulous job of sharing with us the greatness that comes with a Champion Thoroughbred.  Not every story is full of wins, accolades and trophies…many have what we might call lesser stories and on this day I would like to share with you a different story – a magical story – one in which the participants play with “Cover Magic”.

In November of 2014 I met two ladies and an Off the Track Thoroughbred.  Cover Magic is his racing name – Chandler is what we call him at the barn.  The story begins with the great Alydar who went on to be a top sire in the late 80’s and early 90’s — Alydar’s progeny won at a top level for so many years.  Well as a top line, it was bound to be well represented throughout the thoroughbred racing industry.

Cover Magic, a grandson of Alydar, has over $200,000 in career earnings…yet, when he came to the end of his racing career…there was no fanfare when he retired.  Cover Magic was sold and his trainer moved on to the next horse in the barn … all the while thinking and believing that Cover Magic had gone to a good home.

Our story jumps to just a few years ago.  Laura and her team from Perfect Fit Equine Rescue in Morgan Hill California were called to the local Humane society.  A large horse had been found abandoned and in very poor condition in a creek bed.  He was not using his right hind leg very well.  Part of Laura’s team consists of a deeply knowledgeable horsewoman  …Ruth who just recently turned 70. Ruth immediately jumped in and saved the tail on Cover Magic when the human society officer thought it would be best to cut it all off.  Ruth spent hours getting the tail combed out.

Perfect Fit Equine Rescue brought Cover Magic home and cared for him and adopted him out…but it never quite worked out.  What to do with an Off the Track Thoroughbred (OTTB) that wants to run and has energy.  Nobody was quite sure.  After the third trial adoption did not work, Angie, a friend of Ruth’s looked at Ruth with stars in her eyes and said “Let us co-own this lovely horse” and Ruth stepped in and said “Enough – he is now mine and Angie’s.”

You thought the story was pretty good so far…it gets way better.

Ruth and Angie continued to rehab Cover Magic.  Lots of Groundwork and Round Pen work.  A Dressage trainer spent some time working with them on getting that partnership these two ladies desired.  About 18 months ago, Ruth hit a point in her life where the right knee had become useless and she had a choice – To have the knee replaced so she could ride again – or to just let the knee continue to deteriorate until she had to have surgery and likely hobble around.  One evening, Ruth had a conversation with Cover Magic and the two decided that surgery for Ruth was the best option. Her family could not convince her to have surgery…but the Love of this OTTB – helped her decide.

Ruth rehabed her knee and Angie continued to work with Cover Magic.  The first few rides for Ruth on Cover Magic after her surgery were not the most successful —  a few slide off’s, a near fall, and what seems like a clear fall and bump.  Was this story to come to an end? Had the knee surgery been for not?

 A friend of mine at the rescue called and asked me to see if I had anything I could figure out to help give Ruth the chance she wanted. I pulled out Mom’s new Saddle from Charles Wilhelm that was set up right to help mom with her balance (mom is 70+) and went and told Ruth I had a plan.  We got Ruth on Chandler and she had a successful ride, followed by another successful ride and another success.  Before I knew it Angie was also riding (Ruth and Angie purchased a saddle from Charles) and we were all making plans…  – These plans were to get Cover Magic into his second career…..a career as a dressage horse.

In comes North American Western Dressage (NAWD) and the Virtual Show format.  Because virtual shows allow you to show at home and these ladies did not have a trailer we had a plan. NAWD is a leader in virtual shows and along with Cover Magic making his debut, other riders at Perfect Fit Equine Rescue all made their first Western Dressage rides…and they plan to be back with more rides in July 2015.

Angie and Cover Magic made their show debut with the North American Western Dressage May 2015 Trailblazers show.  Using the Level 1, Test 1 from North American Western Dressage, Angie and Chandler scored a very respectable 61%…both had never been in a dressage show in their life.  Now you may be asking — how about Ruth’s ride.  Well she sat on the sidelines watching and coaching because just a few days after the show, she had to go back to the hospital for surgery yet again (she is doing great and itching to ride)…and the reason she went back in is because she and Cover Magic had a conversation once again about their dreams…and they still have a dream to show in 2015.

Are you ready to ride? Can you see yourself having fun with a little showing? Did you think your dream of showing was falling apart — well Perfect Fit Equine Rescue and North American Western Dressage have shown you the way.  Rescued horses, Western Dressage tests .. and some good old determination….this is what good horsemanship is about….this is what great Thoroughbred Race Horses accomplish…this is what two young friends can do when they set out to make the world better for at least one horse….this is what a 70 year old lady can do when she still wants to ride as she did when she was 16….this is what YOU can do with a virtual show opportunity.

If you are pursuing your dreams and Western Dressage is one of your goals, make sure to seek out a Western Dressage Professional (CLICK HERE) to assist you and your horse on the road to success.

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Angie with Chandler (aka Cover Magic)

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Ruth riding Chandler (aka Cover Magic)

— If you enjoyed reading of  this success, consider working with your local rescue and seeing how you can help them or consider donating to Perfect Fit Equine Rescue so they can continue to serve the horses in need.

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Dr. Mike Guerini is a clinician and Lifetime Founding Pioneer of the Western Dressage Association of America, Professional member and Licensed Judge from North America Western Dressage, author of multiple Horsemanship books, co-inventor of the Equine Hydro-T and specializes in western performance based instruction and you can learn more about Dr. Mike and his 6 C’s of Horsemanship at www.dunmovinranch.com.  Dr. Mike is also part of Coach’s Corral (http://www.coachscorral.com/), an online Horsemanship Coaching program that specializes in video coaching and the 5 Ride Program.  Dun Movin Ranch is also home to the Equine Hydro-T (http://www.hydrot.com/).

10 Common Mistakes in Western Dressage Tests

10 Common Mistakes in Western Dressage Tests

by Dr. Mike Guerini, Ph.D. (www.dunmovinranch.com)

As a Coach and Judge for our growing discipline of Western Dressage, and as we get deeper into the show season for 2015, I thought I would share with you the 10 most common mistakes I see in Western Dressage tests.

1) Incorrect Geometry.  Circles that are not the correct size or shape.

2) Lack of Impulsion.

3) Lack of a free walk.

4) Lack of straightness on entry or final approach down centerline.

5) Lack of consistent cadence/speed.

6) Halt not square or falling to the left or right.

7) Rider late or early in transitions.

8) Horses that are behind the vertical or carrying pole too low.

9) Rider seat position in chair seat or leaning to far forward rather than in correct position.

10) Not knowing where you are in the dressage court and not understanding the difference/spacing for a 20 x 40 vs a 20 x 60 court.

If any of these are causing you issue, make sure to seek out a Western Dressage Professional (CLICK HERE) to assist you and your horse on the road to success.

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Dr. Mike Guerini is a clinician and Lifetime Founding Pioneer of the Western Dressage Association of America, Professional member and Licensed Judge from North America Western Dressage, author of multiple Horsemanship books, co-inventor of the Equine Hydro-T and specializes in western performance based instruction and you can learn more about Dr. Mike and his 6 C’s of Horsemanship at www.dunmovinranch.com.  Dr. Mike is also part of Coach’s Corral (http://www.coachscorral.com/), an online Horsemanship Coaching program that specializes in video coaching and the 5 Ride Program.  Dun Movin Ranch is also home to the Equine Hydro-T (http://www.hydrot.com/).