Homework in Horsemanship – it takes time, it takes planning, it takes a passion to improve.

Homework in Horsemanship – it takes time, it takes planning, it takes a passion to improve.

By: Michael Guerini, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.

Doing homework is critical for the safety and welfare of both horse and rider.

When we think of homework, many adults cringe and recall the days of elementary school, high school, and college when they had homework. For our Youth…when they hear the word homework, they often share how much other “real school” homework they have to complete and that they do not have time for the “horse homework.”

Why does such a simple word cause such a negative reaction for many folks … because homework is work and rarely do people consider it fun (but they should if it is done correctly and with a purpose that helps us with our passion).

Now if we have a favorite subject – let us say trail riding, obstacle work, working cattle, or jumping — just like a favorite subject in school…the homework associated with those activities gets done. For many people – homework is only focused on the “fun” part of the riding experience. These folks will work on specific activities that they see as fun…or as a means to their end goal of getting a win or an award.

Homework for People.

Homework is working on obstacles.

Homework is jumping.

Homework is working cattle.

Homework is riding that dressage test to help the rider memorize the “pattern.”

Homework is purchasing the new blinged bridle or pad or clothing so you look good.

For good horsewomen and good horsemen — there is so much more to homework. Homework is about gymnastic work for the mind and body of the horse and rider. This list below is the homework done by good horsewomen and horsemen – this is the list that true riders focus on.

Homework for good horsewomen and horsemen and Riders.

Homework is working on exercises to help our horse be straight.

Homework is working on exercises to help our horse be obedient.

Homework is working on exercises to help our horse be fit.

Homework is working on exercises to help our horse know where his/her feet are at all times.

Homework is working on exercises to help our horse be supple.

Homework is working on exercises to help our horse be responsive.

Homework is working on exercises to help our horse be balanced.

Homework is working on exercises to help our horse bend correctly.

Homework is working on exercises to improve rider balance.

Homework is working on exercises to improve rider feel of the horse’s feet.

Homework is working on exercises to improve rider refinement of aids.

Homework is working on exercises to improve rider breathing.

Homework is working on exercises to improve rider planning ahead while riding.

Homework is working on exercises to improve rider connection.

Homework is working on exercises to improve rider stamina.

Homework is working on transitions.

Homework is working on the Walk.

Homework is working on patience.

Now in case you missed it – I separated homework into two categories —

Homework for People & Homework for good horsewomen and horsemen and Riders.

Of course I made this separation intentionally – because the next section is for the riders who want to do homework to develop both the horse and rider.  Here is a list of exercises that will help good riders (and their horses) continue to improve and be ready to take on anything and succeed and focus on the well-being of the horse.

  • Shallow Loop serpentines at the walk and trot
  • Walk and trot your horse from the ground. Do this from both sides … plan to work ¼ mile or more on each side of the horse and at each gait. If you cannot trot – then work the walk at multiple tempos. (This is much to do about harmony of horse and handler and rider fitness).
  • Set up one of those amazing ground pole patterns we see all over the internet … work those patterns at walk and trot while riding your horse.
  • Walk and trot transitions in the saddle – make transitions between the gaits every 13 strides.
  • Walk and trot work over ground poles with and without 4 1/2 to 5 feet spacing between the 3 ground poles.
  • Walk work without stirrups while riding and focus on Turn on Forehand, Turn on Haunches, backing, side passing, and balanced halts – all without stirrups.
  • Work on riding straight lines at walk and trot. Make sure your eyes are up and that your seat bones are even and that you are balanced. Have a spotter to make sure you are keeping your eyes up and looking ahead.
  • Ground poles work from the ground with your horse. Work at walk and trot and do this on a cavesson or halter.  With and without saddle is a great way to work the horse.  Make certain you are working to achieve straightness of your horse with the proper bend.
  • Ride staircase leg yields at the walk with your horse. Notice if your horse has the ability to move the same in each direction.
  • Count footfalls on a straight line and on circles at the walk and trot. Mark out your straight line and circles with cones (or other marker) and work on consistency of the number of footfalls from cone to cone (marker to marker) at both walk and trot.  You can do this from the saddle on this day.
  • Ride squares and practice TOH (Turn on the Haunches) at each corner going in both directions then work on TOF (Turn on Forehand) at each corner going in both directions.
  • Walk and trot in the Snowman pattern (from Jane Weatherwax – 20 m circle, then 15 m circle then 10 m circle). If your horse is not at the developmental stage to properly execute a 15 m or 10 m circle – then consider making each a 20 m circle).  For the proper snowman…if you start left, then middle circle is right, then last circle is left — switch it up and start both directions.
  • Ride S turns through a circle at walk and trot
  • Ride at walk and trot around 7 cones (use buckets or rocks if you do not have cones). Keep focused on bend and tempo
  • At the trot, practice three seat positions of rising/posting, sitting and two point….and keep tempo the same
  • Ride a 20 meter circle at walk and trot at three different tempos in both directions
  • Core day! Work on core exercises for you and for your horse.  Hillary Clayton has a great book on core exercises for your horse.  For the rider – leg lifts or sit ups might work nicely – you decide.  Once you get your plan set for this day – consider doing this 3 times a week for you and your horse.
  • Trot to halt to back for two steps and then ride forward once again at the trot. Repeat this up to 10 times.
  • Work on moving shoulders of the horse to the left and right at the walk and trot
  • Work on improving the finesse of your rider aids by tossing a ball or kicking a ball (with both hands and legs).
  • Ride the Spiraling Circle at the walk (and if you feel it is good – then also complete at the trot). For sure go both clockwise and counterclockwise. Do a 20m, then 18m, then 16m, then 14m and finally a 12m circle and then go back up at the same size change.  Really focus on stabilizing the circle and bend before you worry about going to the next size smaller or larger circle.

Be more for your horse and be more for yourself — ride with a focus on mental and physical gymnastics so that you live your passion of riding.

Thank you for taking the time to read my thoughts and you are most welcome to share this blog if you wish.

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Dr. Mike Guerini is a scientist, author, and horsemanship Coach in Gilroy California.  Mike is focused on balanced horsemanship that takes into account the mental, physical, spiritual, and emotional well-being of the horse.  Mike is also the co-inventor of the Equine Hydro-T.  You can learn more about Dr. Mike at www.dunmovinranch.com.

 

Riding Both Sides of your Horse — 5 Thoughts

Riding Both Sides of your Horse  — 5 Thoughts

by Dr. Mike Guerini, Ph.D. (www.dunmovinranch.com)

Does your horse have a difference in response on one side as compared to the other side?

As we become better riders, we must develop the ability to ride both sides of our horse – as the horse needs.

To do this, we need to feel the different sides.  Do you know which side of your horse is stiff, which side is hollow?  The stiff side has more tension and the horse’s jaw and poll is tighter and more resistant.  The body might feel like one giant solid 4 x 4 post.  Horses often lean into the stiffer side, fall (drop shoulder) into a circle, or make tight and abrupt turns.  On the hollow side, the horse has no resistance and you might have to work to keep contact on your horse because it gives so slightly to pressure.  As you move in the direction of the hollow side, the horse may drift to the outside or overbend.

There are reasons for a horse to have a difference between sides.  A horse can be right or left handed (scientifically proven based on in-utero implantation) and this creates a difference between the sides, uneven muscle development, and rider related issues (balance, rider asymmetry, etc.).

Here are five thoughts about how you can make sure you ride both sides of your horse.

  1. Determine which side is the hollow side and which is the stiff side.  When you know this, you can make certain that through correct exercises you help the horse become more balanced/even on each side.  Work with your coach to develop a plan so that you actively exercise both sides of your horse.
  2. Do contralateral training for the rider.  Make certain you are doing the right exercises for the rider – these should include contralateral exercises (exercises that rely on movement of body parts on the opposite side of the body).  This is important so that you can effectively use (for example) inside leg to outside rein (opposite parts of your body need to work in harmony).
  3. Improve Rider balance.  Work on rider balance with Pilates, Yoga, Tai Chi, or other programs that help you strengthen your balance and core.  Along the way, make sure your exercise program includes some good cardio work.
  4. Learn how to apply the aids correctly and as needed.  You may need a stronger aid on one-side verses the other (early on in your training).  Know this and make certain you adjust to the needs of your horse as you bring him into balance.  This will take time and it really benefits from riding with mirrors in your arena and even more so when you have a coach or video your rides (or video rides and review with your coach…even better).
  5. Learn to feel the balance in your horse.  This takes time but it is very critical.  Have an observer help you develop the feel.  Learn how it feels when your horse bulges out on one side, drops its shoulder on another side, has its rear end fall out of the circle or square.  Feel comes with time and it really helps to have someone coaching you (eyes on the ground as we say) so that you can have them tell you what is happening and you can develop the knowledge and feel….with this and your own rider preparation – you can then ride both sides of your horse to put him into balance and achieve rider to horse harmony.

Thank you for reading and please feel free to share.

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Dr. Mike Guerini is a clinician, author of multiple Horsemanship books, co-inventor of the Equine Hydro-T and specializes in western performance based instruction and you can learn more about Dr. Mike and his 6 C’s of Horsemanship at www.dunmovinranch.com.  Dr. Mike is also part of Coach’s Corral (http://www.coachscorral.com/), an online Horsemanship Coaching program that specializes in video coaching and the 5 Ride Program.  Dun Movin Ranch is also home to the Equine Hydro-T (http://www.hydrot.com/).

Four Ways that Driving (or sitting) may be affecting your Horsemanship

Four Ways that Driving (or sitting) may be affecting your Horsemanship

by Dr. Mike Guerini, Ph.D. (www.dunmovinranch.com)

We all know that driving and sitting normally in a chair seat put us into that “chair seat position” we all want to avoid while riding horses.  But what other things do we do while driving or sitting in a chair for long periods of time affect our riding posture?  Any of these things listed below might just build posture habits

1) Leaning on the center console while we drive.  Sometimes I take trips to clinics or shows that are 3 or 4 hours long (or longer) and I find myself leaning on the center console for a good portion of the trip.  This collapses my rib cage (right rib cage) — something I most certainly want to avoid while riding.

2) Leaning to far forward towards the steering wheel.  This leads us to have a hunched back — something we want to avoid in our riding.

3) Leaning back away from the steering wheel.  This gets us accustomed to sitting on our seat pockets and not our seatbones… and sitting on our seat pockets is bad for our riding position.

4) Sitting in the car for long trips with our wallet (or papers or cell phone) in our back pocket (this one is especially a problem for men). This leads us to have imbalanced seatbones and this certainly messes with us being able to ride and use our seatbones correctly.

Have I got you thinking now?  What other things do you do while driving or working at your computer/desk that might be affecting your riding posture and success with your aids.  Take a few minutes and add to this list — share here on this blog and let us all begin to work on changing our habits to better prepare us for success in the saddle.

Once you have read (and added to) this list, take the time to adjust your car seat or desk chair to optimize your sitting position so that you do not compromise your riding posture.

Thanks for reading this blog and please share.

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Dr. Mike Guerini is a clinician, author of multiple Horsemanship books, co-inventor of the Equine Hydro-T and specializes in western performance based instruction and you can learn more about Dr. Mike and his 6 C’s of Horsemanship at www.dunmovinranch.com.  Dr. Mike is also part of Coach’s Corral (http://www.coachscorral.com/), an online Horsemanship Coaching program that specializes in video coaching and the 5 Ride Program.  Dun Movin Ranch is also home to the Equine Hydro-T (http://www.hydrot.com/).

Four Ways that Dancing WILL Improve your Horsemanship

Four Ways that Dancing WILL Improve your Horsemanship

by Dr. Mike Guerini, Ph.D. (www.dunmovinranch.com)

Ballroom dancing with the Cha-Cha-Cha, Rhumba, Tango, and Waltz are just a few examples of dances that we all recognize.  Many of us know how to Line Dance, Square Dance and I bet a few others are very skilled at other dance forms.  Archeological evidence for early dance includes 9,000 year old paintings in India at the Rock Shelters of Bhimbetka, and Egyptian tomb paintings depicting dancing figures, dated c. 3300 BC. Though there is controversy over the exact date horses were domesticated and when they were first ridden, the best estimate is that horses first were ridden around 4500 BC.

With Horse riding and Dancing –  we are dealing with two activities that have stood the test of time.  We hear and read about people “Dancing with Horses” so the merging of these two activities is known.

Here are four reasons that a little Dancing goes a long way in helping you with your Horsemanship.

Footfalls – Dancing has much to do with footfalls.  Your feet need to work independently, taking metered steps, change with the time and the tempo, and your feet need to flow across the dance floor.

In riding horses, one of the major keys to success are knowing and working with the footfalls of your horse.  When we take the time to learn to dance, we learn how to control our footfalls and we learn the biomechanics of how our body works.  By understanding how our body works – we are better prepared for riding correctly and using our rider aids to influence the footfalls of the horse.

When we are doing ground work – having proper footfalls helps us get in time and in tune with our horse. We succeed in our ground work, when we put our feet in the correct position to aid the horse in the movement.  If we are off balance or our feet are in the way—the horse cannot move correctly.

Coordination – Riding a horse or working with your horse from the ground takes coordination.  By learning how to dance – we learn how our body moves and we build better coordination.  Our hands and legs and seat all might need to move independently in a dance routine…much like what we might need to do when riding with finesse.

Mind – When we dance, we must learn a routine or plan (sometimes in the moment) how we are going to move. If we are dancing with a partner – we certainly must plan what we are going to do or we wind up bumping into each other.  Dancing helps us use our mind to think and plan our next move.  If we are standing on our left leg and need to go left, we have to plan how to shift our weight and move our body….. and we need to have this same level of planning in our horsemanship when we ride or do ground work.

Teamwork – Many forms of dance require a partner.  Horsemanship is the ultimate dance where both partners communicate with subtle touches, changes in contact, and often times — silent communication.  With a human dance partner we work as a team with one partner leading and the other following that guidance.

Want to improve your horsemanship – grab your husband, wife, boy/girlfriend, or find a willing friend or stranger and learn to dance and practice your dancing.  You will notice improved control of your own footfalls, a better understanding of how your body moves, enhanced coordination with your body, better mental planning, and improved teamwork.  Your horse will thank you for doing your homework and you just might enjoy the time.

Thanks for reading this blog and please share.

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Dr. Mike Guerini is a clinician, author of multiple Horsemanship books, co-inventor of the Equine Hydro-T and specializes in western performance based instruction and you can learn more about Dr. Mike and his 6 C’s of Horsemanship at www.dunmovinranch.com.  Dr. Mike is also part of Coach’s Corral (http://www.coachscorral.com/), an online Horsemanship Coaching program that specializes in video coaching and the 5 Ride Program.  Dun Movin Ranch is also home to the Equine Hydro-T (http://www.hydrot.com/).

5 Ways to get more out of your Riding Lessons and Clinics

By: Dr. Mike Guerini (www.dunmovinranch.com)

Have you been taking lessons for a few months and do not seem to be making progress? Do you wonder if you lack the ability? Have you thought about buying another horse that seems better? Do you think your trainer is boring to listen to?

As riders we often give over control of our learning process to the instructor. Sometimes we say “Fix my riding problems” or “Get my horse to respond better to me.” We need to take control of our learning.

Let me repeat what I just wrote – WE NEED TO TAKE CONTROL OF OUR LEARNING. Now I am not saying argue with your trainer every minute of the lesson…that never turns out well. What I am saying is that if you want to improve as a rider – come prepared to learn.

1) Have goals… Monthly and quarterly goals. Share with your instructor the goals you want to achieve. He or she can then work to craft a learning plan with you that will help you achieve those goals. A good conversation with your instructor is the key to building a good learning environment. But remember – a good conversation needs both you and the instructor to listen and hear what each of you is saying.

2) Do your homework between lessons. I remember back to the days when I was learning to play the piano and guitar. Mr. O’Brien would give me homework and I would practice…the day before the next lesson. With a twinkle in his eye, Mr. O’Brien would ask me how often I had practiced. As a 12 year-old I tried the “I practiced lots” answer. He knew and the one and only time I tried that – I knew that I was dancing a line between truth and a lie.Instructors know immediately if you have practiced. So be honest to yourself and your horse and if you have made a commitment to learning – do your homework. If you have not done your homework – let your Instructor know. Good instructors can help you get motivated in your homework and learning – because good instructors are also good coaches, cheerleaders, motivators, and mentors who want to see you and your horse succeed.

3) Eat before the lesson…even just a snack. In the last-minute dash to get your horse loaded and to the lesson or get ready for the instructor to show up you decide to skip breakfast or lunch (or both). You will have a big dinner after your lesson or the clinic. BAD IDEA. When you are hungry you will not learn as well. (Note: the large fancy coffee drink before a lesson will give you that sugar high stamina…but not the energy you need to learn). Have some fruit or nuts or something that your stomach can work on during the lesson.One of the instructors I ride and co-teach with each year is Connie Sparks in Montana. Connie feeds the herd of horses and youth before each clinic. Eggs and French toast is often on the menu – you know why – because Connie is a good instructor who knows the value of getting food into young (and old) bodies so that learning can happen.

4) Keep a journal and lesson log. Write down your thoughts after each lesson or clinic. When you take the time to keep track of your progress it is much easier for you to see your successes. In the journal or lesson log you can write questions regarding your homework…then it helps you connect to doing your homework and know what you want to ask your trainer at the next lesson.

5) Recap after the lesson to make sure you know your homework. Sit down after the lesson or clinic and talk with your instructor. Plan so that you have five minutes of talk time to recap what you learned and what you need to do before the next lesson. In all of my clinics, after each day, we have a chat session. I always ask people “What did you learn that you will take home?” This is to help them recall things from the clinic or the lesson that they found particularly important for their improvement.

Taking a lesson or going to a clinic is all about learning so that you and your horse can improve as a team. Make sure that you are prepared to learn by following these five suggestions.  Feel free to comment on this post with additional suggestions as to how people can improve their learning at clinics and lessons.

Share this Blog and Share your Thoughts?

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Dr. Mike Guerini is a clinician, author of multiple Horsemanship books, co-inventor of the Equine Hydro-T and specializes in western performance based instruction and you can learn more about Dr. Mike and his 6 C’s of Horsemanship at www.dunmovinranch.com.  Dr. Mike is also part of Coach’s Corral (www.coachscorral.com), an online Horsemanship Coaching program that specializes in video coaching and the 5 Ride Program.  Dun Movin Ranch is also home to the Equine Hydro-T (www.hydrot.com).

State of Your Riding

By: Dr. Mike Guerini (www.dunmovinranch.com)

With the upcoming State of The Union address by the President of the United States, it got me thinking about this process and how it compares to evaluating the State of Your Riding.  Weeks of preparation go into the State of the Union Address, the President gives his speech, the other party gives a rebuttal, the news media and other people all share opinions about what the speeches meant, and a few others jump in along the way and offer yet another speech, rebuttal, or comment. In the State of the Union, there is some reflection on the good and bad events of the past year and there is a look forward to the next year and what needs to be accomplished.

Well as equestrians, we should take some time to reflect on the good of the past year, the bad that we overcame, and where we are going in the future.  The one thing we know as horse riders is that we need to evaluate our riding and the skills of our horse on a very frequent basis.  The problem comes when we forget to evaluate honestly and get stuck in a rut.

As a way to help — I offer four ideas for evaluating your State of Riding.

1) Take a lesson with a new clinician or trainer or coach.  Step out of your comfort zone and seek the input or advice of someone else. Sometimes this can be in a video evaluation or an in-person lesson. I am not suggesting that you abandon your coach/trainer/lesson giver that spends countless hours with you; rather, I am suggesting you get an additional opinion.  Those in my lesson program are encouraged, and in some cases, required to go ride with someone else at least once a year. As a coach, I value the input of other trainers for my clients.

2) Go on rides with friends and get their honest opinion as to what you should work on in your riding or with your horse. Sure, it is nice to ride at home, or with your family, or the one friend who always says kind words to you…but this will not help push you to the next level.  Get some critical advice from other riders.  Load up your trailer and head an hour or two away to the person you met online and go riding with that person. Hear about your horse and riding from another equestrian you have connected with online. (Note: each year I do this two or three times a year)

3) Take a monthly video of your riding and then every three months play all the videos in one sitting. Do you notice changes for the better or worse? Are you riding better? Is the ride you took a video of today the exact same ride as three months ago — if that is the case you may not be progressing, pushing yourself, or you just may be at a loss for something new to try with your horse. This is a great way to perform a self-evaluation.

4) Have a non-horse person watch you ride and ask you questions. This can be very frustrating and difficult to hear.  The first thing that comes to your mind is “What does he/she know?”.  Honestly, if a non-horse person asks you a question about something you just did in your ride and you think — “I never do that” — it is likely that you are fooling yourself about your riding skills and how well your horse is doing.

These are just a few ideas that you might consider using to help you review the “State of Your Riding”.  As always, I look forward to you sharing this blog and your added comments.

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Dr. Mike Guerini is a clinician, author of multiple Horsemanship books, co-inventor of the Equine Hydro-T and specializes in western performance based instruction and you can learn more about Dr. Mike and his 6 C’s of Horsemanship at http://www.dunmovinranch.com. Dun Movin Ranch is also home to the Equine Hydro-T (www.hydrot.com).

“Broke,” “Green,” and “Finished” Horses – Is this what we want?

By: Dr. Mike Guerini (www.dunmovinranch.com)

Have you heard about the “Dead Broke Finished Horse” that a friend purchased the other day.  Or maybe you heard about the trainer down the road that has a “Horse that is Broke to Death” that you need to purchase or ride.  I have seen people get giddy with excitement about the prospect of purchasing a “Broke” Horse.  Still others are joyous about getting a “Green” horse.  Some excitedly tell me that they finally have their horse “Broke” and can get some things done now and maybe even move on to getting him “Finished”. Normally about this time when I hear these stores I am grimacing and groaning.  Broke and Green are not terms I want to use to describe the quality horses I work with and here is why.

Many of the online definitions for the word “Broke” center around — having no money; bankrupt; To cause to separate into pieces suddenly or violently; smash;  To vary or disrupt the uniformity or continuity of.

As we move on and look at the online definitions of “Green” we find —  The hue of that portion of the visible spectrum lying between yellow and blue, evoked in the human observer by radiant energy with wavelengths of approximately 490 to 570 nanometers. (Had to throw in the nanometer range for a few of the science geek friends who know me).  I have not seen a naturally green colored horse so far in my life.

For these first two words — nothing in the definitions I just shared with you are useful in describing a good quality horse.  Surely most people know what you might be speaking about but that is the problem — these two words are totally open to interpretation based on experiences.

Finally we come to the description of “Finished” —  Highly accomplished or skilled; polished; Having no more use, value, or potential; washed-up; nothing more can be done with the item. Okay — so I might not mind having a highly accomplished or skilled horse but  I certainly do not want a horse that is “washed-up”.

What is the solution to this problem?  In the next section of this blog I want to share with you how I describe the skill levels of horses.  With this description we shall all understand the ability of horses.

In many things — a picture is worth a thousand words. I shall begin with Figure 1 that summarizes how I describe and categorize horses. I welcome your thoughts and comments and hope this blog is shared and discussed so we can all cease using terms like Broke, Dead Broke, Green, and Finished..

HORSE SKILL LEVELS

Figure 1: Horse Skill Levels

Foundation —  On the ground or in the saddle the horse goes forward calmly, backs, and moves left and right (side to side).  The horse knows to respect your space, stand quietly, tie to a solid object, pick up feet on command, and be groomed — all in a safe manner.  The horse is learning that pressure and release cues/aides mean something and the horse responds.

Mindful — A horse that is mindful has awareness.  Certainly cues and aides are something that the Foundation horse learns. When they reach the mindful level, pre-signals and soft/subtle aides guide the horse.  We might describe a horse being mindful as one that is moving forward and is feeling the rider and knows what is coming and responds with the lightest possible aide.  Once you have a horse at the mindful level you are making that connection that leads to harmony, rhythm, relaxation and balance.  A mindful horse is seeking guidance from the rider to know what it should do next.

Practiced — This is a horse that understands the job and can get the job done.  This horse can easily respond to aides with athleticism, quickness, and agility.  With a practiced horse we no longer see hesitation by the horse.  The practiced horse is one that comes with experience and is working towards that perfect maneuver with the rider.  A practiced horse is frequently limited by the ability of the rider.

Competent — This is a horse that has the necessary ability, knowledge, or skill to do something successfully — sometimes even when the rider is lost in the saddle.  99% of the time the competent horse can respond to the aide without hesitation and achieve success.  A horse at this level excels with a good rider but can also help the less experienced rider succeed.

As I wrote this blog to describe skills of the horse it dawned on me that we might be able to describe riders in much the same way.  I look forward to you sharing and commenting on this information.

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Dr. Mike Guerini is a clinician, author of multiple Horsemanship books, co-inventor of the Equine Hydro-T and specializes in western performance based instruction and you can learn more about Dr. Mike and his 6 C’s of Horsemanship at http://www.dunmovinranch.com. Dun Movin Ranch is also home to the Equine Hydro-T (www.hydrot.com).