Sensible & Sensitive Horsemanship – Dr. Mike’s Horsemanship Guides

By: Dr. Mike Guerini (www.dunmovinranch.com)

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Available on Amazon.com (Click HERE)

Or for a personalized copy of this paperback at $20 (shipping and handling included), email Michael@dunmovinranch.com and we will get your order processed.

This is a combined work containing Dr. Mike’s Horsemanship Ground Steps to Success, Dr. Mike’s Horsemanship Responsive Riding, Dr. Mike’s Horsemanship Riding Exercises, Dr. Mike’s Horsemanship Horse Owner’s Modern Keys for Success. Together this collection takes horse and rider from ground work to build a strong foundation to riding with softness and focus. Dr. Mike’s Horsemanship Ground Steps to Success Horsemanship lessons that teaches you the basic foundations of ground work that will help you build a stronger relationship with your horse. Inside you will find improved ways of working with your horse so that you can succeed in every equestrian discipline. This book covers the essentials of ground work that can be translated into the saddle. This electronic book includes: 1) Preparation for Ground work and Riding 2) Understanding your Horse’s body language 3) Pre-signal and preparatory commands, and 4) Ground Steps to Success (walk, whoa, disengage hips, back, go forward cue and other movements). Dr. Mike’s Horsemanship Responsive Riding In this book Dr. Mike provides numerous training exercises so that riders will gain a better feel of the horse. Each exercise is well described and shares with you the benefit of performing the exercise. The book includes multiple warm-up exercises for getting better directional control and the proper use of your legs when riding. Advanced exercises are included for enhanced responsiveness. The basics of dressage and proper biomechanics are presented to help you improve your body language and pre-signal communications with your horse. Dr. Mike’s Horsemanship Riding Exercises This book includes 12 easy to follow riding exercises complete with written instructions and diagrams. Great for warm-ups and giving you and your horse some new challenges. These exercises incorporate Classical and Western Dressage Elements. Dr. Mike’s Horsemanship Horse Owner’s Modern Keys for Success. A collection of Essays from many years of successful horsemanship. This book focuses on ideas to help new horse owners build a strong foundation of thoughts and ideas for success in owning, riding, and training horses.

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Dr. Mike Guerini is a clinician, author of multiple Horsemanship books, co-inventor of the Equine Hydro-T and specializes in western performance based instruction and you can learn more about Dr. Mike and his 6 C’s of Horsemanship at www.dunmovinranch.com.  Dr. Mike is also part of Coach’s Corral (www.coachscorral.com), an online Horsemanship Coaching program that specializes in video coaching and the 5 Ride Program.  Dun Movin Ranch is also home to the Equine Hydro-T (www.hydrot.com).

Cool Down after Competition – Are you doing it right?

By: Dr. Mike Guerini (www.dunmovinranch.com)

You have just finished your class at the horse show. You pat your horse on the neck as a sign of appreciation for the nice job.  Your horse is tired. You are tired. Your mind is running a thousand thoughts through your head about what you could and should have done differently (or if you did not agree with the class placements, you wonder if the judge missed how spectacular you and your horse were in the class).

You loosen the cinch just a bit on your horse and proceed to the barn or trailer to unsaddle and pack up for the day or prep for the next class. Along the way you stop and chat with your friend about the next show…or you celebrate your win with a few high five’s.

Are you making a mistake following the above routine?  — The answer is Probably YES and if you do this all the time – MOST DEFINITELY YES!

Why are you making a mistake is the question you should be asking by now.

Your error comes in thinking you and your horse are finished with that class and there is no immediate homework.  Sorry folks but life is filled with homework and if you do not study what you did and set yourself up for the next success — you will be stuck performing at the same level — or worse, you will see a decline in how you and your horse perform after each show.

A short story here for you all.  A horseperson called me a few months back to describe how her horse was acting up at the shows. She mentioned that the horse was getting more and more anxious at each show and seemed to be anticipating every single minute of the entire show day. This horse was normally calm at home but at the show it was getting hard to deal with. The person wanted to know if I thought the horse was past its prime for showing and needed to be retired.  I asked her to describe her normal horse show routine.  She described what 85% of all show people do after their class – nothing to prepare herself or the horse for the next success.   Since that time we have solved this issue and I want to share with you how we set her and her horse up for success.

How to set you and your horse up for Success at the next show – while still at the current show:

A) Take notes or give yourself a voice memo in your phone as soon as you can after your class/test. Your memory is great for 5 minutes after the class, but 1 hour later and you will not recall how to describe that feel or issue you had in the class. Preparation for the next class/test begins immediately after finishing the current class.

B) Take your horse back to the warm-up arena. You heard me – get back to the warm-up arena (which in my world should also be called the cool down arena). PLEASE NOTE – I am not saying that you go back and lope circles or do a vigorous warm-up. I am also not advocating that you go back and immediately begin working on issues and training your horse.

  1. Re-establish Relaxation and Rhythm with your horse. This is very important. Many show issues and anxious horses come from not having a guided process that gets the horse back into rhythm and relaxation and harmony after the test/class/performance. If you abandon Rhythm and Relaxation after your class/test/performance – you are failing your horse.
  2. At the walk, move your horse to help him/her flex joints to promote circulation and movement. If you want to still be riding your horse and competing when the horse is 15+ years old, then take care of it by using a process to promote recovery. Great athletes always make certain to have a cool down routine that promotes rapid recovery of your body….works for people and most certainly this works for horses.

We all get busy at the show, sometimes (or may times) have multiple horses to show but we need to make sure we take the time to make things right for our horse. Follow these above suggestions and you will be setting yourself up for many future successes in the arena.

Thank you for Reading this blog.  Share this Blog and Share your Thoughts!

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Dr. Mike Guerini is a clinician, author of multiple Horsemanship books, co-inventor of the Equine Hydro-T and specializes in western performance based instruction and you can learn more about Dr. Mike and his 6 C’s of Horsemanship at www.dunmovinranch.com.  Dr. Mike is also part of Coach’s Corral (www.coachscorral.com), an online Horsemanship Coaching program that specializes in video coaching and the 5 Ride Program.  Dun Movin Ranch is also home to the Equine Hydro-T (www.hydrot.com).

5 Ways to get more out of your Riding Lessons and Clinics

By: Dr. Mike Guerini (www.dunmovinranch.com)

Have you been taking lessons for a few months and do not seem to be making progress? Do you wonder if you lack the ability? Have you thought about buying another horse that seems better? Do you think your trainer is boring to listen to?

As riders we often give over control of our learning process to the instructor. Sometimes we say “Fix my riding problems” or “Get my horse to respond better to me.” We need to take control of our learning.

Let me repeat what I just wrote – WE NEED TO TAKE CONTROL OF OUR LEARNING. Now I am not saying argue with your trainer every minute of the lesson…that never turns out well. What I am saying is that if you want to improve as a rider – come prepared to learn.

1) Have goals… Monthly and quarterly goals. Share with your instructor the goals you want to achieve. He or she can then work to craft a learning plan with you that will help you achieve those goals. A good conversation with your instructor is the key to building a good learning environment. But remember – a good conversation needs both you and the instructor to listen and hear what each of you is saying.

2) Do your homework between lessons. I remember back to the days when I was learning to play the piano and guitar. Mr. O’Brien would give me homework and I would practice…the day before the next lesson. With a twinkle in his eye, Mr. O’Brien would ask me how often I had practiced. As a 12 year-old I tried the “I practiced lots” answer. He knew and the one and only time I tried that – I knew that I was dancing a line between truth and a lie.Instructors know immediately if you have practiced. So be honest to yourself and your horse and if you have made a commitment to learning – do your homework. If you have not done your homework – let your Instructor know. Good instructors can help you get motivated in your homework and learning – because good instructors are also good coaches, cheerleaders, motivators, and mentors who want to see you and your horse succeed.

3) Eat before the lesson…even just a snack. In the last-minute dash to get your horse loaded and to the lesson or get ready for the instructor to show up you decide to skip breakfast or lunch (or both). You will have a big dinner after your lesson or the clinic. BAD IDEA. When you are hungry you will not learn as well. (Note: the large fancy coffee drink before a lesson will give you that sugar high stamina…but not the energy you need to learn). Have some fruit or nuts or something that your stomach can work on during the lesson.One of the instructors I ride and co-teach with each year is Connie Sparks in Montana. Connie feeds the herd of horses and youth before each clinic. Eggs and French toast is often on the menu – you know why – because Connie is a good instructor who knows the value of getting food into young (and old) bodies so that learning can happen.

4) Keep a journal and lesson log. Write down your thoughts after each lesson or clinic. When you take the time to keep track of your progress it is much easier for you to see your successes. In the journal or lesson log you can write questions regarding your homework…then it helps you connect to doing your homework and know what you want to ask your trainer at the next lesson.

5) Recap after the lesson to make sure you know your homework. Sit down after the lesson or clinic and talk with your instructor. Plan so that you have five minutes of talk time to recap what you learned and what you need to do before the next lesson. In all of my clinics, after each day, we have a chat session. I always ask people “What did you learn that you will take home?” This is to help them recall things from the clinic or the lesson that they found particularly important for their improvement.

Taking a lesson or going to a clinic is all about learning so that you and your horse can improve as a team. Make sure that you are prepared to learn by following these five suggestions.  Feel free to comment on this post with additional suggestions as to how people can improve their learning at clinics and lessons.

Share this Blog and Share your Thoughts?

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Dr. Mike Guerini is a clinician, author of multiple Horsemanship books, co-inventor of the Equine Hydro-T and specializes in western performance based instruction and you can learn more about Dr. Mike and his 6 C’s of Horsemanship at www.dunmovinranch.com.  Dr. Mike is also part of Coach’s Corral (www.coachscorral.com), an online Horsemanship Coaching program that specializes in video coaching and the 5 Ride Program.  Dun Movin Ranch is also home to the Equine Hydro-T (www.hydrot.com).