FIVE TRUTHS FOR GREAT HORSEMANSHIP

By: Dr. Mike Guerini (www.dunmovinranch.com)

Five Truths for Great Horsemanship

#1 – Time spent leads to success.

If you want to improve your riding, get to the barn, ride, take lessons, go to clinics, and ask questions of people that ride better than you.

#2Your Hands controlling the Horse’s feet leads to success.

If you can ride softly and speak to your horse through the reins and have control over the front and rear legs of your horse you are on the road to success.

#3Watch yourself or someone else ride your horse.

When you can step back and see what your horse does, how she moves, how she flexes/bends, how she responds, you are on the road to better understanding of your horse.

#4Ride the horse between your legs.

Do not get on a horse and expect him/her to be exactly like another horse you have ridden.  Each horse is unique and you need to ride the one that is between your legs.  Another way of saying this is do not expect one horse to be like another – make goals and plans for that specific horse.

#5Cross-training for you and your horse develops leadership, confidence, and skill.

Teach your horse something different and you will connect with his/her mind.  When you connect with the mind, you teach new skills, gain confidence and the horse realizes you can lead.

Dr. Mike Guerini is a clinician, author of multiple Horsemanship books, co-inventor of the Equine Hydro-T and specializes in western performance based instruction and you can learn more about Dr. Mike and his 6 C’s of Horsemanship at www.dunmovinranch.com. Dun Movin Ranch is also home to the Equine Hydro-T (www.hydrot.com).

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AWARE — Important for Trail Riding with your Horse

By: Dr. Mike Guerini (www.dunmovinranch.com)

Be AWARE on the trail

Acquaint yourself with the trail and the area where you are riding
Watch the trail/weather for unsafe and changing conditions
Actively ride your horse, do not just be a passenger
Respect other riders/bikers/hikers on the trail
Enjoy the ride

Dr. Mike Guerini is a clinician, author of multiple Horsemanship books, co-inventor of the Equine Hydro-T and specializes in western performance based instruction and you can learn more about Dr. Mike and his 6 C’s of Horsemanship at www.dunmovinranch.com. Dun Movin Ranch is also home to the Equine Hydro-T (www.hydrot.com).

5 People in your Circle of Horsemanship

By: Dr. Mike Guerini (www.dunmovinranch.com)

We all have some people in our life who we count on to help us along the journey.  We sometimes call these people our “posse”, “BFF’s”, “Village”, “inner circle”, “confidants”, or “our team”.  Well in Horsemanship it is really no different.  We flourish and excel when we have people who help us, engage us, support us, and keep us in line.  So the other day I was reflecting on the people I consider to be part of my Circle of Horsemanship and I identified 5 who are critical to me.

1)  Veterinarian.  In this category I actually have a few veterinarians I rely on.  They all know each other and some specialize in legs, others in reproduction and some in holistic health of the horse.  I am fortunate to be friends with a veterinarian who has mentored me for over 20 years.  For me it is important to have a good veterinarian (or in my case a few) that I rely on and receive good medical advice from when it comes to the health of my horses.

2)  Farrier.  For over 20 years I had the same farrier.  He was always on time, explained what he was doing, and kept my horse’s feet in top shape.  When my old farrier passed away I was lucky enough to find my new farrier and he is always on time, works with me and the horses and once again does a great job.  I feel fortunate and blessed to have found two great farriers in my life.  Almost nothing is more important that my horse having balanced and well taken care of hooves.

3)  Coach/Trainer.  Without a coach or trainer to watch me ride, work on new ideas with me, and to be my second set of eyes I know I would not have made it this far in my riding career.  My coach is not always a professional horseman or horsewoman, but most of the time I do have a coach who is a professional.  My coach helps me better myself, offers advice on training issues, and those who I select to be my coach/trainer are always looking out for the best interest of my horses.

4)  The Friend Who Helps you No matter What.  I think the country singer Tracy Lawrence was thinking of my friend when he sang the song — Find Out Who Your Friends Are.  This is the person who you can call in the middle of the night to come rescue you and your horse from the side of the road when your truck breaks down.  This person drops everything to help you build fence, haul hay, go check out a new horse, or do anything you need…without expecting anything in return.  Let us face it — owning horses can be a tough job some days and we all need a little extra help.

5) The Cheerleader.  In my Circle of Horsemanship I have a friend who roots me on, encourages me, and listens.  This friend does not ride, might actually be a bit afraid of horses but as soon as I start talking horse, this friend sits down and listens.  I wondered if I was the only one to have this type of friend until a few weeks ago when a lady stopped by for a riding lesson.  She brought along a friend who just wanted to see the world of horse lessons and cheer her friend on to success.

You might have more than 5 in your Circle of Horsemanship.  We could add people like Hay person, Chiropractor, Equine Massage Therapist, Parents, Spouses, Significant others, Fellow Horse people, or Hauling/Show buddy.

Who else might you add to your Circle of Horsemanship?  Is it more than 5?  Take a few minutes to thank those people who are in your Circle of Horsemanship.

Right now I give a big shout out to all of you who are in my Circle of Horsemanship.  Thanks friends.

Dr. Mike Guerini is a clinician, author of multiple Horsemanship books, co-inventor of the Equine Hydro-T and specializes in western performance based instruction and you can learn more about Dr. Mike and his 6 C’s of Horsemanship at www.dunmovinranch.com. Dun Movin Ranch is also home to the Equine Hydro-T (www.hydrot.com).

Preparing for a Horsemanship Clinic – what to do before and what to pack (works for horse shows also)

By: Dr. Mike Guerini (www.dunmovinranch.com)

No matter if you have been to one or 50 Horsemanship clinics, there is always a check list of items we need to take, some we want to take, and sadly a few we forget to take.  Over the years I have worked to compile lists of what I need at horsemanship clinics and by extension, horse shows.  Some of these are well thought out lists and some come from experience…you know the been there had that happen and won’t be without again (hint — a clean set of clothes).

This year I have had a few people ask how to prepare and so I want to share with you my thoughts and as always, I look forward to your additions.

First let us discuss the early preparation of what to do before a Horsemanship clinic

1) Sign up for the clinic

2) Check out some of the information about the clinician and how he/she structures the clinic.  This is the gathering of information so you know what to expect at the clinic.  Read one of the clinicians books or blogs or website articles.

3) Get your horse prepared for the clinic by making sure he/she is vaccinated, coggins paperwork is in order (if necessary), health certificate is in order (if necessary), farrier is on the right schedule for the horse to have great feet at the clinic, ride or ground work your horse so that he/she is physically prepared,

4) Get yourself physically ready (riding might be enough or you may want to add a few more exercise or stretching routines leading up to the clinic).

5) If you need a hotel or place to stay … make those arrangements early.

6) Call the facility hosting the clinic if you need overnighting of your horse and arrange for accommodations (find out if you need to bring bedding, buckets, etc).  I always recommend that you bring your own hay and feed from home for a clinic.

7) A few days before the clinic, make sure your truck (vehicle you pull your trailer with) is in proper working order.  Oil is in good shape, tires are good, windshield wipers work, vehicle is clean and has room for all your stuff.

8) A few days before the clinic, make sure your trailer is in proper working order.  Check the tires (wear and inflation), make sure the back of the trailer is cleaned out of left over manure, make sure your tack room is organized and ready for more items and make sure the doors all work and the trailer lights are fully functional when hooked to your vehicle.  (Note — nothing worse than driving down the road with no trailer lights.  A few years back I came upon a trailer being pulled down the road with no trailer lights.  People had a hard time seeing the trailer and so the poor guy was on the receiving end of rude gestures, much honking, and one person made the guy stamp on his brakes by trying to cut him off.  Once I was able to get up to him, I tucked in behind him and followed him for many miles.  After 25 minutes or so he waved me on up alongside him and yelled a big thanks and took the next free way exit.)

Now let us get into what we need to pack — I break this into three categories including what I need for the horse, what I need for me, and what I need for emergencies.

For the horse I need to pack — Tack (saddle, bridles, etc), leg protection, a blanket or fly sheet (and one extra) if you normally use these on your horse, hay, grain (normal ration with maybe some extra salt to promote drinking), water buckets, brushes, curry combs, hoof pick, water (in some cases it is best to pack water from home), fly mask, extra cinch, extra saddle pad, extra reins, extra halters, insect repellant (fly or mosquito spray), manure fork/rake, and of course his/her favorite treats.

For the person I pack — clothes (boots, jeans, long sleeve shirts), snacks, food, water (and other liquid non-adult beverages), sunscreen, hat/helmet, CASH (you never know when you want to purchase something at the clinic and they do not take checks), toiletries, medications, comfortable shoes and riding shoes, cell phone charger/extra battery, camera, pen and paper (for writing down notes on things you learn), lip gloss (for those windy/dry days), a chair, extra socks (for when yours get wet from sweating), and a list of where you are staying, directions on how to get to the clinic and all other registration details.

What I need for emergencies — Horse first aid kit (whatever you would normally have at your barn for treating your horse until the veterinarian can get there), human first aid kit (some small band aids, wound cream, pain reliever, brace, etc), an extra pair of clothes in your trailer (I have literally ridden and worked so hard I was soaked to the skin and a dry pair of clothes felt great), spare tires (for truck and trailer), small pieces of leather (great for putting tack back together, duct tape, bailing twine (or wire), and any medicines that you might use only occasionally for yourself (allergy meds/prescriptions, insulin, pain killers, etc).

Share what else you would add to these lists — and thank you for taking a few minutes to read what I have shared with you here.

Dr. Mike Guerini is a clinician, author of multiple Horsemanship books, co-inventor of the Equine Hydro-T and specializes in western performance based instruction and you can learn more about Dr. Mike and his 6 C’s of Horsemanship at www.dunmovinranch.com. Dun Movin Ranch is also home to the Equine Hydro-T (www.hydrot.com).